Next, Ms. Everett reviewed some of the key foods that are important for your diet. She emphasized that balance is essential – that is, to not eat too much of one thing and not enough of another. Different foods have different nutritional components. Included in the important foods that Ms. Everett highlighted were a variety of fruits and vegetables; foods low in calories and saturated fats; and foods high in antioxidants, fiber, calcium, vitamin D, and Omega 3 fatty acids.
In patients with SLE and nephritis who progress to end-stage renal disease, dialysis and transplantation may be required; these treatments have rates of long-term patient and graft survival that are similar to those observed in patients without diabetes and SLE. [61] However, transplantation is considered the treatment of choice because of improved survival rates. [61]

Any problem with managing of your lupus diet must be consulted to your doctor so that he can refer you to a registered dietician who can create a diet that will best suit your nutrition requirements. But one should remember that there are no difficult rules when planning a diet for a lupus patient like yourself. You should just be always aware foods that usually trigger your lupus symptoms. A lupus diet plan shall effectively help you control the symptoms of lupus as well as improve your general well being.

The medical doctors who treat lupus are rheumatologists who specialize in arthritis and other inflammatory disorders. However, depending on the individual, case treatment may involve a wide range of health professionals including clinical immunologists (doctors specializing in immune system disorders), nurses, psychologists, social workers, nephrologists (kidney disease specialists), hematologists (specialists in blood disorders), dermatologists, and neurologists.
It is important to not just rely on supplements to help improve your symptoms, as both diet and supplements together are important. Supplements are unregulated, so the quality and content may vary widely. You may need to take up to several doses per day of supplements to get the same effect that is in the food. Always try and consume the food before looking into supplements. Again, speak with your doctor.
Some patients with mild lupus, with a little joint pain or rash can be managed with anti-inflammatory drugs such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen or naproxen, says Stuart D. Kaplan, MD, the chief of rheumatology at South Nassau Communities Hospital in Oceanside, New York. These drugs can also help manage fever and inflammation of the heart and lining around the lungs. (2)
Because some treatments may cause harmful side effects, it is important to report any new symptoms to the doctor promptly. It is also important not to stop or change treatments without talking to the doctor first. In addition to medications for lupus itself, in many cases it may be necessary to take additional medications to treat problems related to lupus such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure, or infection.

A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 40 patients with juvenile-onset SLE suggests that cholecalciferol supplementation for 24 weeks is effective in decreasing disease activity and improving fatigue in these patients. Compared with the placebo group, patients receiving oral cholecalciferol 50,000 IU/week demonstrated significant improvement in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) scores (P = 0.010) and European Consensus Lupus Activity Measurement (ECLAM) scores (P = 0.006), along with a reduction of fatigue related to social life, as measured by the Kids Fatigue Severity Scale (K-FSS) score (P = 0.008). [110]
Scientists have suspected for years that infections from bacteria, viruses, and other toxins were likely to blame for the development of conditions like lupus. And while they have not been able to identify one single culprit, they have found strong correlations with a number of bacteria and viruses. For example, the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been shown to trigger lupus in some individuals.4
Get involved in your care. Learn as much as you can about lupus, your medications, and what kind of progress to expect. Take all your medications as your doctor prescribes, and visit your rheumatologist often to prevent serious problems. This lets your doctor keep track of your disease and change your treatment as needed. If you do not live near a rheumatologist, you may need to have your primary care doctor manage your lupus with the help of a rheumatologist.

Today, physicians treat lupus using a wide variety of medicines, ranging in strength from mild to extremely strong. Prescribed medications will usually change during a person’s lifetime with lupus. However, it can take months—sometimes years—before your health care team finds just the right combination of medicines to keep your lupus symptoms under control.

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Please Note: The material on this site is provided for informational purposes only and is not medical advice. Always consult your physician before beginning any diet or exercise program.

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