Trisha Gilkerson is a homeschooling mom to four crazy boys. She blogs with her awesome hubby Luke at Intoxicated on Life where they talk about faith, homeschooling, and health. They’ve authored the Write Through the Bible curriculum and family Bible Studies and have recently released their first healthy living book – Weeding Out Wheat: A Simple Faith Based Guide. They love connecting with their readers, so be sure to follow them on their blog, Facebook, Twitter, Google+, and Pinterest.
Bladderwrack: Bladderwrack or fucus vesiculosus is a natural treatment for hypothyroidism and has proven to reduce the symptoms of the condition. It is actually a seaweed (a type of brown algae), found in several oceans across the globe. Bladderwrack is rich in iodine content, thereby proving to be an effective thyroid stimulant. It is seen to reduce the size of the thyroid gland during goiter and also restores its functioning. A person suffering from it can take a 600 mg Bladderwrack capsule with water 1-3 times a day.
I was struggling with such symptoms of hypothyroidism such as fatigue, digestive and sleep issues, slight weight gain, sensitivity to heat and cold, depression, muscle weakness and hair loss. I have noticed positive changes in my mood; I have also become much less sensitive to cold. I am sleeping better as well. I am on a gluten free diet as well and I must say I feel better than ever. I am not fatigued or easily tired anymore; no digestive issues or hair loss. Actually, I am symptom free now 🙂 So thanks again for your help! TSH/T3/T4 have all improved. Also red blood cell count /vitamin D/DHEA/ improved. No zinc and copper deficiency anymore. Yes, it’s much easier to take a drug…but if you are looking for a cure, give a natural treatment protocol (and your internal system!) a fair chance.
Dietary changes: For those who have existing thyroid conditions, excess consumption of soy may affect thyroid function, but this is probably a concern only in those already taking Synthroid or other thyroid replacement medication. If you consume soy on a regular basis, you may require a slightly increased dosage of replacement therapy. You should also know that if you eat soy foods at the same time that you take thyroid hormone, they may interfere with its absorption. To be safe, do not eat soy within three hours of taking your medication. Moderate soy consumption (one serving daily of whole soy foods) should not be a problem. Adequate iodine from dietary sources is also important – iodized salt, fresh ocean fish and seaweed are good sources.

I think most people with hypothyroidism would agree that their condition is not due to a deficiency of synthetic thyroid hormone. Even though this is obviously true, most endocrinologists tell just about all of their patients with hypothyroidism and Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis to take synthetic thyroid hormone medication for the rest of their life without trying to find out why the person developed a hypothyroid condition to begin with. Although some people do need to take synthetic or natural thyroid hormone on a permanent basis, many people can have their health restored back to normal through natural hypothyroid treatment methods.
It's not enough for your thyroid levels to be "normal" or fall within the reference range. In many cases, for you to lose weight with hypothyroidism, you need your thyroid levels to be "optimal." That means that your thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level would typically fall below 2.0, and your free T4 and free T3 would fall in the upper half of the reference range.
Iodine:  Iodine is critical for thyroid hormone production in the body.  A true iodine deficiency will cause hypothyroidism (43).  In western culture we often see subclinical iodine deficiencies which contribute to hypothyroidism (44). I typically don’t recommend high doses of iodine as it could be problematic with individuals with Hashimoto’s – especially with TPO anti-bodies.
Levothyroxine tablets come in 12 different strengths, and it is essential to take them in a consistent manner every day. A dose of thyroid hormone that is too low may fail to prevent enlargement of the thyroid gland, allow symptoms of hypothyroidism to persist, and be associated with increased serum cholesterol levels, which may increase the risk for atherosclerosis and heart disease. A dose that is too high can cause symptoms of hyperthyroidism, create excessive strain on the heart, and lead to an increased risk of developing osteoporosis.

You may have read that green, leafy veggies like kale, bok choy, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts can make hypothyroidism worse. But before you keep reading, ask yourself a question: Do you live in the United States? That’s key — because if you do, you likely don’t need to worry about these cancer-fighting veggies messing with your hypothyroidism management. (7)

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Please Note: The material on this site is provided for informational purposes only and is not medical advice. Always consult your physician before beginning any diet or exercise program.

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