Gluten intolerance is highly associated with inflammatory disorders of all kinds (63).  It is also a contributing factor in many autoimmune diseases such as celiac disease, rheumatoid arthritis, type I diabetes, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, autoimmune cardiomyopathy, lymphoma and dermatitis herpetiformis (skin disease) among others (64, 65). If you have a thyroid problem or just want to avoid having a future thyroid problem, the first place to start is on a gluten-free nutrition program!

Iodine:  Iodine is critical for thyroid hormone production in the body.  A true iodine deficiency will cause hypothyroidism (43).  In western culture we often see subclinical iodine deficiencies which contribute to hypothyroidism (44). I typically don’t recommend high doses of iodine as it could be problematic with individuals with Hashimoto’s – especially with TPO anti-bodies.
There is little mention of patients who did not respond symptomatically to treatment despite having normalization of their other measured variables, such as BMR or serum PBI, in the early clinical trials in the 1940s through 1960s. After the 1970s (38, 52), a new category of hypothyroid patient was recognized: the patient who received thyroid hormone replacement therapy, had normal serum TSH, and exhibited residual symptoms of hypothyroidism. Initially, such symptoms were largely dismissed as unrelated to the thyroid condition (62). Indeed, hypothyroidism is prevalent, and symptoms overlap with those of other common conditions, including menopause, depression, and chronic fatigue syndrome. Likewise, thyroid hormone had been administered for nonthyroid disorders, including obesity and psychiatric disease, for decades. Thus, it was difficult to assess whether patients with residual symptoms had been misdiagnosed. Residual symptoms were even attributed to nonadherence (63).
Try this: Cut apples crosswise (don’t peel them—the skin is the richest source of pectin!), dredge in brown sugar, then pan-fry in coconut oil until tender; top with shredded basil and crumbled blue cheese. Spiralize a whole apple with skin, lightly steam in apple juice until tender, and serve with yogurt, hemp seeds, and blueberries as a breakfast noodle bowl. Simmer chopped apples, parsnips, shallots, and sprigs of thyme in broth until tender; remove thyme sprigs and purée until smooth; top with additional thyme and a dollop of crème fraîche.
The problematic compound in soy (for your thyroid) are the isoflavones. In fact, a study in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism reported that researchers fed some subjects 16 mg of soy isoflavones, which is the amount found in the typical vegetarian's diet,  and others 2 mg soy isoflavones, which is the amount found in most omnivore's diets.
Getting enough fiber is good for you, but too much can complicate your hypothyroidism treatment. The government's Daily Guidelines for Americans currently recommends that older adults take in 20 to 35 grams of fiber a day. Amounts of dietary fiber from whole grains, vegetables, fruits, beans, and legumes that go above that level affect your digestive system and can interfere with absorption of thyroid hormone replacement drugs.
Megan Casper, RDN, a dietitian based in New York City and the founder of Nourished Bite, points out that iodine deficiency is the leading cause of hypothyroidism worldwide. This mineral can’t be made by the body, so dietary sources like iodized salt, dairy products, seafood, seaweed, and fortified cereals are important. “Iodine is an essential nutrient in the body, and thyroid hormones are composed of iodine,” explains Rizzo. “Those lacking thyroid hormones may also be lacking iodine.”

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