Like many progressive thyroid practitioners, such as Dr K and Dr Wentz, I believe there is no need to cut these wonderful vegetables 100% out of our diets. The reason is: all crucifers are high in DIM (di-indolyl-methane) which is a substance that supports the liver detoxification pathways. This detoxification process helps us eliminate metabolized (or “used up”) hormones like estrogen as well as thyroid hormones to make space for new ones.
Probiotics can help heal the gut and aid in nutrient absorption while reducing inflammation. Other benefits of a high-quality probiotic include helping to maintain a stronger immune system; increasing energy from production of vitamin B12; reducing bacterial or viral growth in the gut such as candida; improving skin health and helping with appetite control and weight loss.

Every three months, you will repeat this process. This repetition is to ensure that you are staying healthy and that the medication is working. As you approach the end of your 90-day prescription, we'll order new lab tests and book a quick check-in with your doctor to make sure that the treatment plan is working for you. If you have any questions in the meantime, you can always give PlushCare a call at 1-888-529-3472, where our Care Coordinators are ready and willing to assist you.


Correcting these problems requires an integrative approach. It involves more than simply taking a thyroid pill. As you’ll see, it involves nutritional support, exercise, stress reduction, supplements, reducing inflammation, and sometimes eliminating certain foods and detoxification from heavy metals (such as mercury and lead) and petrochemical toxins (such as pesticides and PCBs).

l-Thyroxine monotherapy for athyreotic rats results in a high T4:T3 ratio at doses sufficient to normalize serum TSH levels (8). Yet, the brain, liver, and skeletal muscle tissues of these l-thyroxine–treated animals continue to exhibit markers of hypothyroidism (9), probably because of the inability of l-thyroxine monotherapy to restore tissue levels of T3 (8). This is probably a direct consequence of lower serum T3 levels and the relatively high T4 concentration in these tissues, which inactivates the type 2 iodothyronine deiodinase (D2). In the hypothalamus, loss of D2 is minimal in the presence of T4, which increases sensitivity to T4 levels and explains TSH normalization, despite relatively lower levels of serum T3. Only combination therapy with l-thyroxine plus l-triiodothyronine normalized all thyroid hormone–dependent measures (9), including serum and tissue T3 levels (8). Whether tissue-specific markers of hypothyroidism are restored with l-thyroxine monotherapy in humans remains to be determined, as does the ability of l-thyroxine plus l-triiodothyronine combination therapy to normalize the serum T4:T3 ratio without adverse events. The development of a novel drug delivery system for l-triiodothyronine would facilitate these studies (5).
Hyperthyroidism, or overactive thyroid gland, is another common thyroid condition. The most prevalent form is Graves’ disease in which the body’s autoimmune response causes the thyroid gland to produce too much T3 and T4. Symptoms of hyperthyroidism can include weight loss, high blood pressure, diarrhea, and a rapid heartbeat. Graves’ disease also disproportionately affects women and typically presents before the age of 40.4
Hypothyroidism is a disease which causes the thyroid gland to become underactive and not making enough thyroid hormones. The thyroid gland is located in the front lower part of your neck. Hormones released by the gland affect nearly every part of the human body including heart, brain, muscles, and skin. The thyroid controls the metabolism, which affects the body temperature, heartbeat and also regulates the calorie burn. When the body is unable to produce enough thyroid hormone, it causes the metabolism to slow down and hence, the body makes less energy and gain more weight. 
Also available on the market are combination medications that contain both synthetic T4 and T3 hormones, but such medications aren’t usually recommended. For one thing, most patients see their condition improve with synthetic T4 alone because of the ability of the thyroid to convert these hormones to T3 when needed. Also, synthetic T3-T4 combination drugs can cause anxiety — if you have a preexisting mental health disability, such side effects may be even greater. (3)

High-fiber foods – People with hypothyroidism may have digestive difficulties, so aim for 30–40 grams of fiber daily. In addition to a high-fiber diet helping with digestive health, it improves heart health, balances blood sugar levels and supports a healthy weight by making you feel fuller. Some easy ways to increase fiber intake include eating more fresh vegetables, berries, beans, lentils and seeds.


The thyroid gland uses iodine (mostly from foods in the diet like seafood, bread, and salt) to produce thyroid hormones. The two most important thyroid hormones are thyroxine (tetraiodothyronine or T4) and tri-iodothyronine (T3), which account for 99% and 1% of thyroid hormones present in the blood respectively. However, the hormone with the most biological activity is T3. Once released from the thyroid gland into the blood, a large amount of T4 is converted as needed into T3 - the active hormone that affects the metabolism of cells.

Blood sugar imbalances are major contributers to the development of hypothyroidism.   When our blood sugar gets too high (hyperglycemia) the sugar molecules bind to proteins in the body and create Advanced Glycolytic Enzymes (AGEs) (56). The AGEs destroy cell membrane function and damage insulin receptor activity creating a vicious cycle of elevated blood sugar and inflammatory stress.
An unhealthy gut environment can contribute to nutrient deficiencies and raise autoimmune activity in the body. Gut inflammation can be triggered by food sensitivities or allergies, including those to gluten and dairy. Other causes of a damaged gut are high stress levels, toxin overload from diet and the environment, and bacterial imbalances. When leaky gut occurs, small particles that are normally trapped inside the gut start to leak out into the bloodstream through tiny openings in the gut lining, which creates an autoimmune cascade and a series of negative symptoms.

Goitrogens are substances found naturally in certain foods that can slow down the production of thyroid hormone—keep in mind, though, this phenomenon occurs typically in people with an underlying iodine deficiency (which is rare in the United States). Still, even for people without iodine deficiency, experts recommend not over-consuming goitrogenic foods.
If you absolutely must have both your thyroid medication and coffee at the same time, talk to your physician about the liquid capsule form of levothyroxine called Tirosint, which research shows is not affected by coffee. You may also consider taking your thyroid medication at bedtime, instead of in the morning; although, again, be sure to discuss this with your personal physician. 

Trials of the first pharmacologic strategies included intravenous or subcutaneous (12) or oral (15) administration of thyroid extract, in addition to “thyroid feeding,” the consumption of raw or cooked thyroid gland (16), with sustainable successes. Oral replacement strategies quickly won favor, although “alarming symptoms” associated with treatment were noted; however, the details were not fully described (17). Thyroid transplant may one day reemerge as a viable treatment option given that functional thyroid tissue can be generated from stem cells (18).
The thyroid gland is located in your throat area, so it literally connects the mind and body. When you rush while eating, the food moves so quickly from mouth to stomach that the connection from mind to body is not strong. The mouth doesn’t know what the stomach is doing and vice versa. This is good health advice no matter what: sit down, slow down, savor, breathe and chew your food. Since the thyroid is the master of your metabolism, you want to eat slowly enough so it can record the message that food is entering the body.
It is absolutely critical for any physician who is treating someone with a thyroid disorder to test for thyroid antibodies.  Unfortunately, few mainstream medical doctors test for thyroid anti-bodies and so most do not ever get the proper diagnosis. In the medical system, an auto-immune condition, a sluggish thyroid, a burned out pituitary gland and a T4-T3 conversion problem are all treated the same way, with synthetic T4 such as synthroid or a T3 medication like levothyroxin.

Unlike conventional medical treatments, a natural hypothyroid treatment approach tries to get to the underlying cause of your disorder. In other words, upon seeing a competent natural healthcare professional who focuses on endocrine conditions, they will try to determine what is actually causing your thyroid gland to malfunction. In addition to looking at the typical thyroid blood tests, they might also evaluate your adrenal glands, digestive system, hormone levels, and other areas of the body which can be causing your thyroid gland to malfunction. Then assuming this natural healthcare professional feels they can help you, they will recommend a natural hypothyroid treatment protocol that won’t just manage your symptoms, but will also attempt to restore your health back to normal.
Thyroid blood tests determine the adequacy of the levels of thyroid hormones in in a patient. The blood tests can determine if the thyroid gland's hormone production is normal, overactive, or underactive. The level of thyroid hormones may help to diagnose hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism. The test may also point to other diseases of conditions of the thyroid gland.
Many people want to know how to cure hypothyroidism permanently.  It helps to know that those who have hypothyroidism often have it because they have hashimoto’s thyroiditis, which is an autoimmune disease. As such, you must get to the source of the imbalance, not simply cover up the symptoms with medication. (14) In fact, in some cases, treatment of hyperthyroidism can result in permanent hypothyroidism. (15)

An underactive thyroid, or hypothyroidism, occurs when the thyroid gland produces less than the normal amount of thyroid hormone. The result is the “slowing down” of many bodily functions. Although hypothyroidism may be temporary, it usually is a permanent condition. Of the nearly 30 million people estimated to be suffering from thyroid dysfunction, most have hypothyroidism.
A diet low in nutrient-rich foods, especially in iodine and selenium (which are trace minerals crucial for thyroid function), increases the risk for thyroid disorders. The thyroid gland needs both selenium and iodine to produce adequate levels of thyroid hormones. And these nutrients also have other protective roles in the body; for example, severe selenium deficiency increases the incidence of thyroiditis because it stops activity of a very powerful antioxidant known as glutathione which normally controls inflammation and fights oxidative stress.
For more information on how a natural hypothyroid treatment protocol might be able to help you, I recommend getting my free guide entitled “6 Steps On How Natural Thyroid Treatments Can Restore Your Health”. You can obtain your free copy simply by filling out your name and email address on the right side of this page. And just to let you know, this guide contains 100% pure content, and is not a “sales report”, or a pitch for any product or service. You’ll also receive emails on natural thyroid health (typically once or twice a week), and will also receive updates on any free webinars I offer in the future.
Emphasizing lean proteins, vegetables, fruits, heart-healthy fats and omega-3s, high-fiber foods, and appropriate portions can help manage or prevent illnesses associated with thyroid disease. As Schneider notes, “It’s eating for prevention of all these diseases that accompany thyroid disease: heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and more.” As an added bonus, fiber can relieve constipation that people with hypothyroidism often experience.
Foods that contain some vitamin D include fatty fish, milk, dairy, eggs, and mushrooms. Sunlight also is a potential source, but the amount of vitamin production depends on the season and latitude. If clients have low vitamin D levels, supplemental D3 may be necessary, and the client’s physician should monitor progress to ensure the individual’s levels stay within an appropriate range.
“Infants fed soy formula are at higher risk for hypothyroidism and for later development of autoimmune thyroid diseases. In humans, goiter has been seen in infants fed soy formula; this is usually reversed by changing to cow milk or iodine-supplemented diets . After the 1960s, manufacturers reportedly began adding iodine to formulas to mitigate thyroid effects.” [Doerge]

Large predator fish—tuna, swordfish, shark, kingfish, mackerel—often have more mercury than smaller fish, as they’ve lived longer and had more time to accumulate harmful chemicals. Don’t eat more than two to three servings of these fish a week, Blum says. Also, farmed fish like salmon can have higher levels of mercury because they’re often fed the chum of other fish. All fish have a little mercury, so don’t freak out about it. Just don’t order in sushi every weeknight.


Congenital hypothyroidism - Congenital hypothyroidism means that a baby is born with the condition. This occurs when a baby is born without a thyroid or with only a partly formed one. Sometimes, the baby will have part or all of the thyroid in the wrong place in the body (called ectopic thyroid). In some babies, the thyroid cells or their hormones do not work right. All of these issues lead to lifelong hypothyroidism for that human being.
Large predator fish—tuna, swordfish, shark, kingfish, mackerel—often have more mercury than smaller fish, as they’ve lived longer and had more time to accumulate harmful chemicals. Don’t eat more than two to three servings of these fish a week, Blum says. Also, farmed fish like salmon can have higher levels of mercury because they’re often fed the chum of other fish. All fish have a little mercury, so don’t freak out about it. Just don’t order in sushi every weeknight.
It's not enough for your thyroid levels to be "normal" or fall within the reference range. In many cases, for you to lose weight with hypothyroidism, you need your thyroid levels to be "optimal." That means that your thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level would typically fall below 2.0, and your free T4 and free T3 would fall in the upper half of the reference range.

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