Iodine is an essential ingredient in thyroid hormone, and thyroid hormone is critical to the growth and development of the bodies and brains of all baby vertebrates (animals with backbones).  Since they need iodine just as much as we do, and they do not have access to artificially iodized salt, how do they get their iodine?  Do they have a secret stash somewhere that they’re not sharing with us? I assume they are getting enough iodine because if they weren’t, they would all be born brain-damaged runts, and many would be infertile if they survived to adulthood.  To the best of my knowledge, wild inland animals are not herds of sterile, stupefied miniatures roaming the landscape in search of iodine…

The thyroid is the organ with the highest selenium content in the whole body. Selenium is necessary for the production of the T3 thyroid hormone and can reduce autoimmune affects. In patients with Hashimoto’s disease and in pregnant women with thyroid disturbances, selenium supplementation decreases anti-thyroid antibody levels and improves the structure of the thyroid gland.


Because it helps balance hormone levels, selenium can lower the risk for experiencing thyroid disorder during pregnancy (postpartum thyroiditis) and afterward. (15) Other studies have shown that when selenium deficiency is resolved through supplementation, patients experience on average 40 percent reduction in thyroid antibodies compared to a 10 percent increase when given a placebo. (16)
Try this: Make a lassi, a traditional Indian beverage: purée yogurt, frozen mango chunks, and lime juice, then pour into glasses and garnish with slices of lime. Purée yogurt with blackberries, honey, and grated ginger; stir in vanilla yogurt to make swirls and then spoon into Popsicle molds and freeze. Dump a container of yogurt into a cheesecloth-lined strainer and refrigerate overnight; stir in your favorite herbs and seasonings, and use as a substitute for sour cream.
Hi, Dawn: Yes, there’s definitely a TON of conflicting information out there. When it comes to cruciferous vegetables and the thyroid, it’s all about raw veggies, not cooked. Raw cruciferous veg contains a compound called goitrogens, which might impact thyroid function by impairing thyroid peroxidase, an enzyme normally found in the thyroid gland. I don’t think this means that you should NEVER eat a single serving of raw cruciferous veggies if you have thyroid issues. But just that you shouldn’t overdo it and eat raw daily. Hope that helps!
“A teaspoon of iodine is all a person requires in a lifetime, but because iodine cannot be stored for long periods by the body, tiny amounts are needed regularly. In areas of endemic iodine deficiency, where soil and therefore crops and grazing animals do not provide sufficient dietary iodine to the populace, food fortification and supplementation have proven highly successful and sustainable interventions.” [Brahmbhatt 2001].
Selenium:   Selenium is one the MOST IMPORTANT when it comes to healthy thyroid function!  It is incorporated into key enzymes involved in several metabolic pathways implicated in thyroid hormone metabolism; additionally, it plays an antioxidant role in the regulation of the immune system.   There are strong links between selenium deficiencies and auto-immune thyroid problems (48, 49).
Thus, neither desiccated thyroid nor l-thyroxine monotherapy recreates a biochemical state of euthyroidism as defined by the serum T4:T3 ratio. l-Thyroxine and l-triiodothyronine combination therapy theoretically could be titrated to restore this measure, but such a method would be challenging because of the frequent dosing schedule needed to achieve stable serum T3 levels (5). New technology is needed to allow for steady delivery of l-thyroxine; only then would high-quality clinical trials best investigate the utility of the serum T4:T3 ratio as an outcome measure in hypothyroidism.
Central or pituitary hypothyroidism: TSH (Thyroid-stimulating hormone) is produced by the pituitary gland, which is located behind the nose at the base of the brain. Any destructive disease of the pituitary gland or hypothalamus, which sits just above the pituitary gland, may cause damage to the cells that secrete TSH, which stimulates the thyroid to produce normal amounts of thyroid hormone. This is a very rare cause of hypothyroidism.
Although it’s not a very common cause, sometimes newborns are born with a dysfunction of the thyroid gland, a genetic condition called congenital hypothyroidism. Some evidence shows that people are more likely to develop hypothyroidism if they have a close family member with an autoimmune disease. But according to the National Institute of Health (NIH), the likelihood of genetic hypothyroidism is very low and only about one out of every 4,000 newborns is born with a thyroid disorder.
The first step in treatment of hypothyroidism is to eliminate the effects and causes of the thyroid dysfunction, such as inflammation, overuse of medications, nutrient deficiencies, and changes in hormones due to stress. The hypothyroidism diet eliminates foods that can cause inflammation and immune reactions and instead focuses on foods that help heal the GI tract, balance hormones, and reduce inflammation.
I suspect that there is actually enough iodine in the environment to go around, and that we actually need less than 150 micrograms per day of iodine.  From the above list, you can see that animal foods are much richer in iodine than plant foods—so how do herbivores (animals which eat a plant-based diet, such as rabbits and deer) get enough iodine?  I suspect that there is something about the human diet which interferes with our ability to absorb, utilize, and/or retain iodine, and that this is why we appear to be iodine-deficient compared to other animals.  So, what might the possible culprits be?   Hmmm….
The thyroid is considered a master gland and in addition to producing crucial hormones, it also helps control the process of turning nutrients from food into useable energy that your body runs on. Because the thyroid plays such a major part in your metabolism, dysfunction can wind up affecting almost every part of the body, including your energy levels and ability to burn calories.
Alcohol consumption can wreak havoc on both thyroid hormone levels in the body and the ability of the thyroid to produce hormone. Alcohol appears to have a toxic effect on the thyroid gland and suppresses the ability of the body to use thyroid hormone. Ideally, people with hypothyroidism should cut out alcohol completely or drink in careful moderation.

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