“Some evidence suggests that soy foods, by inhibiting absorption, may increase the dose of thyroid hormone required by hypothyroid patients. However, hypothyroid adults need not avoid soy foods. In addition, there remains a theoretical concern based on in vitro and animal data that in individuals with compromised thyroid function and/or whose iodine intake is marginal, soy foods may increase risk of developing clinical hypothyroidism. Therefore, it is important for soy food consumers to make sure their intake of iodine is adequate.” [Messina]


Iodine:  Iodine is critical for thyroid hormone production in the body.  A true iodine deficiency will cause hypothyroidism (43).  In western culture we often see subclinical iodine deficiencies which contribute to hypothyroidism (44). I typically don’t recommend high doses of iodine as it could be problematic with individuals with Hashimoto’s – especially with TPO anti-bodies.
Autoimmune disease - Autoimmune disorders occur when the body’s immune system produces antibodies that attack its own tissues. Scientists aren’t sure why the body produces these antibodies and why it would attack itself. Some think that a virus or bacterium might trigger this, while others believe that genetic factors cause autoimmune disorders. It could also be a combination of the two factors. Regardless of the cause of autoimmune diseases they are thought to be a cause of hyperthyroidism. When the immune system attacks the body, it often targets the thyroid. This limits the thyroid’s ability to produce hormones and results in hyperthyroidism.
The development of TSH assays led to a dramatic reduction in thyroid hormone replacement dosage and the ability to diagnose with certainty milder forms of hypothyroidism. Discovery of peripheral T4-to-T3 conversion gave a physiologic means to justify l-thyroxine monotherapy. In combination with the concerns over consistency and safety of natural thyroid preparations, synthetic l-thyroxine was perceived as a more reliable therapy. These findings laid the foundation for the clinical practice trend away from natural thyroid preparations and toward l-thyroxine monotherapy at doses to normalize the serum TSH. Later, a subpopulation of patients with residual symptoms of hypothyroidism was recognized. It remains to be determined whether this is due to a trend of attributing nonspecific symptoms to minimal thyroid dysfunction, relatively low serum T3 levels and/or high T4:T3 ratio, or the role of Thr92AlaD2 polymorphism, and whether combination therapy with l-thyroxine plus l-triiodothyronine will be beneficial.

If hypothyroidism is left untreated, symptoms of myxedema can appear. These include very dry skin, and swelling around the lips and nose called non-pitting (firm) edema. More severe symptoms can be life-threatening and include low blood pressure, decreased body temperature, shallow respirations, unresponsiveness and even coma. Fortunately, advanced hypothyroidism such as this is quite rare.
Vitamin B12 and thiamine are important for neurologic function and hormonal balance. Research shows that supplementing with thiamine can help combat symptoms of autoimmune disease, including chronic fatigue. In one clinical study, when patients with Hashimoto’s were given 600 milligrams per day of thiamine, the majority experienced complete regression of fatigue within a few hours or days. (18)
Over my several decades working as a Functional Medicine doctor, I can assure you that even in the toughest cases, you can heal your thyroid. With some patients, I can do this through the dietary, nutrient, and lifestyle factors I’ve discussed here. For others, that healing requires trial and error using several medications and working closely with a physician.
In other words, taking supplements and herbs alone is usually not the solution. Plus, while nutritional supplements can help, one must remember that different people will need to take different types of supplements, take different dosages, etc. Plus the quality of the supplements you take is important, and the truth is, many supplements are of low quality. So just taking a general thyroid support formula is usually not the answer to restoring your health back to normal. Doing so not only can worsen your symptoms, but often times taking this approach will be a complete waste of money. In most cases it takes a combination of different factors to restore one’s health back to normal. This includes eating well, doing a good job of managing stress, getting sufficient sleep, improving the health of the gut, minimizing your exposure to environmental toxins, etc.
An underactive thyroid, or hypothyroidism, occurs when the thyroid gland produces less than the normal amount of thyroid hormone. The result is the “slowing down” of many bodily functions. Although hypothyroidism may be temporary, it usually is a permanent condition. Of the nearly 30 million people estimated to be suffering from thyroid dysfunction, most have hypothyroidism.

Large predator fish—tuna, swordfish, shark, kingfish, mackerel—often have more mercury than smaller fish, as they’ve lived longer and had more time to accumulate harmful chemicals. Don’t eat more than two to three servings of these fish a week, Blum says. Also, farmed fish like salmon can have higher levels of mercury because they’re often fed the chum of other fish. All fish have a little mercury, so don’t freak out about it. Just don’t order in sushi every weeknight.


Ashwagandha is an adaptogen herb that helps the body respond to stress, keeping hormone levels better in balance. Adaptogens helps lower cortisol and balance T4 levels. In fact, in clinical trials, supplementing with ashwagandha for eight weeks essentially worked as thyroxine treatment, helping hypothyroidism patients significantly increase thyroxine hormone levels and thus reduce the severity of the disorder. (13) Also, try other adaptogen herbs like rhodiola, licorice root, ginseng and holy basil, which have similar benefits.
The diagnosis of “subclinical” hypothyroidism that I discussed last week depends on having a TSH level higher than 5 m IU/ml and lower than 10 m IU/ml. As I mentioned above, new guidelines suggest anything over 3 is abnormal. While an improvement, practitioners following these guidelines may still miss many people who have normal test results and a malfunctioning thyroid system.
I had no idea that I had type II diabetes. I was diagnosed at age 50, after complaining to my doctor about being very tired. There is no family history of this disease. I’m a male and at the time of diagnosis, I weighed about 215. (I’m 6’2″)Within 6 months, I had gained 30 to 35 pounds, and apparently the diabetes medicines (Actos and Glimiperide) are known to cause weight gain. I wish my doctor had mentioned that, so I could have monitored my weight more closely. I was also taking metformin 1000 mg twice daily December 2017 our family doctor started me on Green House Herbal Clinic Diabetes Disease Herbal mixture, 5 weeks into treatment I improved dramatically. At the end of the full treatment course, the disease is totally under control. No case blurred vision, frequent urination, or weakness
Before you read on, it’s key to know that 90% of hypo- and hyper-thyroidism results from an autoimmune disorder. (Most people do not realize this, as doctors often don’t take time to explain things.) Most hypothyroid conditions are Hashimoto’s and most hyperthyroid conditions are Graves’ Disease, which means that your immune system is attacking your thyroid. Since the immune system resides in the gut or our intestine (Did you know that?!) a lot of what you will read here is about rebuilding the digestive system.

Exercise and a healthy diet are important for controlling chronic stress and managing hormone-related neurological function. Research shows that people who regularly exercise usually get better sleep, deal with stress better and usually maintain a healthier weight, too, all of which reduce some of the biggest risk factors and symptoms associated with hypothyroidism.
Keep in mind, however, that if you switch to a high-fiber diet, you should get your thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) rechecked in eight to twelve weeks to see if you need a dosage readjustment, as fiber can affect the absorption of thyroid hormone replacement medication. Moreover, a high-fiber diet may worsen bloating (usually temporarily), which is a common symptom in people with hypothyroidism. 

Processed snacks, such as cookies, chips, crackers and–even some protein bars–often contain high fructose corn syrup. “The body processes it so much more differently than sugar,” says DiCarlo. “Those foods in and of themselves can cause hormonal imbalances and weight gain, more-so with people with hypothyroidism,” she adds. So what do you eat when jonesing between meals? You can try these healthy snack ideas instead of junk food. By sticking to food in its whole, original form, you can stay away from the 150 Worst Packaged Foods in America.


Fat is your friend and cholesterol is the precursor to hormonal pathways; if you’re getting insufficient fat and cholesterol, you could be exacerbating hormonal imbalance, which includes thyroid hormones. Natural, healthful fats include olive oil; ghee; avocados; flax seeds; fish; nuts and nut butters; hormone- and antibiotic-free full fat cheese, yogurt, and cottage cheese (yes, full fat, not skim); and coconut milk products.

Selenium:   Selenium is one the MOST IMPORTANT when it comes to healthy thyroid function!  It is incorporated into key enzymes involved in several metabolic pathways implicated in thyroid hormone metabolism; additionally, it plays an antioxidant role in the regulation of the immune system.   There are strong links between selenium deficiencies and auto-immune thyroid problems (48, 49).
Probiotics can help heal the gut and aid in nutrient absorption while reducing inflammation. Other benefits of a high-quality probiotic include helping to maintain a stronger immune system; increasing energy from production of vitamin B12; reducing bacterial or viral growth in the gut such as candida; improving skin health and helping with appetite control and weight loss.
Thyroid hormone replacement has been used for more than a century to treat hypothyroidism. Natural thyroid preparations (thyroid extract, desiccated thyroid, or thyroglobulin), which contain both thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3), were the first pharmacologic treatments available and dominated the market for the better part of the 20th century. Dosages were adjusted to resolve symptoms and to normalize the basal metabolic rate and/or serum protein-bound iodine level, but thyrotoxic adverse effects were not uncommon. Two major developments in the 1970s led to a transition in clinical practice: 1) The development of the serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) radioimmunoassay led to the discovery that many patients were overtreated, resulting in a dramatic reduction in thyroid hormone replacement dosage, and 2) the identification of peripheral deiodinase-mediated T4-to-T3 conversion provided a physiologic means to justify l-thyroxine monotherapy, obviating concerns about inconsistencies with desiccated thyroid. Thereafter, l-thyroxine mono-therapy at doses to normalize the serum TSH became the standard of care. Since then, a subgroup of thyroid hormone–treated patients with residual symptoms of hypothyroidism despite normalization of the serum TSH has been identified. This has brought into question the inability of l-thyroxine monotherapy to universally normalize serum T3 levels. New research suggests mechanisms for the inadequacies of l-thyroxine monotherapy and highlights the possible role for personalized medicine based on deiodinase polymorphisms. Understanding the historical events that affected clinical practice trends provides invaluable insight into formulation of an approach to help all patients achieve clinical and biochemical euthyroidism.
Thyroid scanning is used to determine how active the thyroid is in manufacturing thyroid hormone. This can determine whether inflammation of the thyroid gland (thyroiditis) is present. It can also detect the presence and degree of overactivity of the gland (hyperthyroidism) or, conversely, it can determine the presence and degree of underactivity of the gland (hypothyroidism).
Hypothyroidism can be easily treated with thyroid hormone replacement. The preferred treatment for most people with an underactive thyroid is levothyroxine sodium (Levoxyl, Synthroid). This is a more stable form of thyroid hormone and requires once a day dosing.Liothyronine sodium (Cytomel) also may be prescribed to treat hypothyroidism under certain conditions.
Supplements may also mess with your treatment and can be harmful. Iodine supplements, for example, can cause your thyroid to make too much or too little hormone. Too much of a healthy vitamin isn't good for you. Fiber supplements can absorb medication and keep the full dose from working in your body. Herbs may interfere with your medication and may not be safe or effective.

In effect, there is no single, specific diet or vitamin/mineral supplement that has been proven to eliminate thyroid disease, according to the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine.  If you would like more guidance on the right diet to meet your individual needs, you can consider working with a registered dietitian who has a specialty in thyroid health, or an integrative medicine physician.
The development of TSH assays led to a dramatic reduction in thyroid hormone replacement dosage and the ability to diagnose with certainty milder forms of hypothyroidism. Discovery of peripheral T4-to-T3 conversion gave a physiologic means to justify l-thyroxine monotherapy. In combination with the concerns over consistency and safety of natural thyroid preparations, synthetic l-thyroxine was perceived as a more reliable therapy. These findings laid the foundation for the clinical practice trend away from natural thyroid preparations and toward l-thyroxine monotherapy at doses to normalize the serum TSH. Later, a subpopulation of patients with residual symptoms of hypothyroidism was recognized. It remains to be determined whether this is due to a trend of attributing nonspecific symptoms to minimal thyroid dysfunction, relatively low serum T3 levels and/or high T4:T3 ratio, or the role of Thr92AlaD2 polymorphism, and whether combination therapy with l-thyroxine plus l-triiodothyronine will be beneficial.
If you have hypothyroidism or a family history of goiters, you can reduce your risk by mixing up your choice of vegetables so you aren’t eating a lot of the same vegetable day in and day out, cooking your vegetables and chewing them thoroughly which helps to break down the worrisome substances, says Dr. Leung. And, it wouldn’t hurt to avoiding eating cruciferous vegetables raw; even lightly steaming then will deactivate the thiocyanates enough to assure that you aren’t eating more than your thyroid can handle.3

Vitamin B12 and thiamine are important for neurologic function and hormonal balance. Research shows that supplementing with thiamine, also known as thiamin or Vitamin B1, can help combat symptoms of autoimmune disease, including chronic fatigue. In one clinical study, when patients with Hashimoto’s were given 600 milligrams per day of thiamine, the majority experienced complete regression of fatigue within a few hours or days.[6] Vitamin B12 is another important nutrient for fighting fatigue since it benefits the central nervous system in many important ways: maintaining the health of nerve cells (including neurotransmitters), protecting the covering of nerves called the cell’s myelin sheath, and turning nutrients from food into useable energy for the brain and body. Designs for Health B-Supreme has an array of B vitamins (including thiamine and Vitamin B12) and additional co-factors that help the body utilize the B vitamins.


Essential fatty acids found in fish oil are critical for brain and thyroid function. DHA and EPA omega-3s found in fish oil are associated with a lower risk for thyroid symptoms, including anxiety, depression, high cholesterol, inflammatory bowel disease, arthritis, diabetes, a weakened immune system and heightened autoimmune disease. Omega-3 fish oil supplements can also help balance levels of omega-6s in the diet, which is important for ongoing health.
ADHD Bipolar Disorder Brain Health Cancer Carbohydrates carbohydrate sensitivity casein Cholesterol Constipation Crucifers Dairy Depression diabetes Dopamine fasting Fiber Food Sensitivity Fructose Fruits Gout Grains Heart Disease Histamine Hypertension Hypothyroidism IBS insulin insulin resistance iron ketogenic diet ketosis low-carbohydrate diet Meat obesity Omega-3 Processed meat Protein red meat Refined Carbohydrates Sugar Vegan Vegetables Vegetarian Weight Loss whey
Do a little Googling, and you might turn up a page or two claiming that cruciferous vegetables can cause thyroid troubles. The truth is a little murkier. While it's true that these veggies contain compounds called glucosinolates, which might interfere with your body's production of thyroid hormones in high amounts, it's pretty unlikely that they'll harm your thyroid if you're eating normal-size servings. One case report in the New England Journal of Medicine highlighted the story of an 88-year-old woman who showed up to the ER with hypothyroidism after eating about 2 or 3 pounds of bok choy a day—but, as Ilic points out, "that's not a normal amount."
** Medications** - Some medications can contribute to hypothyroidism. Medicines such as lithium, amiodarone, interleukin-2 and interferon alpha can prevent the thyroid gland from producing its hormones normally. These medicines are most likely to affect the thyroid’s functionality in patients who have a genetic susceptibility to autoimmune thyroid disease.
These clinical trials also began to define the adverse-effect profiles associated with these agents; thyrotoxicosis was frequently encountered. Patients treated with l-triiodothyronine3 (100 to 175 mcg/d) normalized BMR faster than did those receiving desiccated thyroid (120 to 210 mg/d) or l-thyroxine (200 to 350 mcg/d) but were more likely to experience angina (32). Desiccated thyroid was also associated with adverse symptoms in other studies; muscle stiffness, psychosis, and angina all occurred (33). In a crossover study of l-triiodothyronine monotherapy (75 to 100 mcg/d), l-thyroxine monotherapy (200 to 300 mcg/d), and desiccated thyroid (1.5 to 3 grains/d), all of these therapies restored BMR and serum PBI; with l-triiodothyronine, however, angina and heart failure occurred. Dose reduction corrected these adverse effects, but authors concluded that l-thyroxine monotherapy or thyroid extract was preferred (34). In a trial of l-thyroxine monotherapy at doses of 200 to 300 mcg/d versus l-thyroxine (80 mcg) plus l-triiodothyronine (20 mcg) daily, patients receiving the combination had such symptoms as palpitations, nervousness, tremor, and perspiration (35). Some early proponents of l-thyroxine monotherapy emerged because of less frequent thyrotoxic effects (24), but it is difficult to determine whether such adverse effects were related to the agent used or its high dosage. Thyrotoxic adverse effects were typically remediable by simple dose reduction (36), so desiccated thyroid remained the preparation of choice (37).
These clinical trials also began to define the adverse-effect profiles associated with these agents; thyrotoxicosis was frequently encountered. Patients treated with l-triiodothyronine3 (100 to 175 mcg/d) normalized BMR faster than did those receiving desiccated thyroid (120 to 210 mg/d) or l-thyroxine (200 to 350 mcg/d) but were more likely to experience angina (32). Desiccated thyroid was also associated with adverse symptoms in other studies; muscle stiffness, psychosis, and angina all occurred (33). In a crossover study of l-triiodothyronine monotherapy (75 to 100 mcg/d), l-thyroxine monotherapy (200 to 300 mcg/d), and desiccated thyroid (1.5 to 3 grains/d), all of these therapies restored BMR and serum PBI; with l-triiodothyronine, however, angina and heart failure occurred. Dose reduction corrected these adverse effects, but authors concluded that l-thyroxine monotherapy or thyroid extract was preferred (34). In a trial of l-thyroxine monotherapy at doses of 200 to 300 mcg/d versus l-thyroxine (80 mcg) plus l-triiodothyronine (20 mcg) daily, patients receiving the combination had such symptoms as palpitations, nervousness, tremor, and perspiration (35). Some early proponents of l-thyroxine monotherapy emerged because of less frequent thyrotoxic effects (24), but it is difficult to determine whether such adverse effects were related to the agent used or its high dosage. Thyrotoxic adverse effects were typically remediable by simple dose reduction (36), so desiccated thyroid remained the preparation of choice (37).

In fact, more and more people with hypothyroidism are turning to holistic care, as many people are simply sick and tired of covering up their symptoms by taking thyroid hormone medication. While there are some great endocrinologists and medical doctors out there who are trying to help their patients the best that they can, just about all of these healthcare professionals are trained to treat conditions through the use of drugs and surgery. And while this sometimes is necessary, many times there are other options. Although symptom management is without question important, just think about how great it would feel if you were able to fully restore your thyroid health back to normal through a natural hypothyroid treatment protocol, and not have to rely on taking synthetic or natural thyroid hormone for the rest of your life.


They are the building blocks of your digestive tract and of our hormones. We are fat-phobic in America, and low-fat diets are one of the worst things we’ve ever invented. Europeans and Asians have fat-rich diets (traditionally) and enjoy much better health than we do. Good fat tips: avocados, walnuts, coconut oil, coconut butter. Animal fats are the best in restoring a troubled digestion; ghee (clarified butter), butter, chicken and beef fat are essential but need to be rendered and not in fried or processed form.

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