According to some estimates, 40 percent of the population suffers with some form of low thyroid function. Women, especially older women, are the most susceptible group for developing hypothyroidism. People who are elderly or who have other existing autoimmune diseases – like type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and celiac disease, for example – are also at a higher risk.
Many allergies and food intolerances today are from wheat and dairy products. This is because of the hybridized proteins of gluten and a1 casein. These proteins can lead to “leaky gut”, which in turn will cause inflammation of the thyroid and effect its function. If you can’t follow a grain-free diet, at least cut out gluten. Additionally, only consume dairy products that come from A2 cows, goat milk, or sheep milk. (2)
I was struggling with such symptoms of hypothyroidism such as fatigue, digestive and sleep issues, slight weight gain, sensitivity to heat and cold, depression, muscle weakness and hair loss. I have noticed positive changes in my mood; I have also become much less sensitive to cold. I am sleeping better as well. I am on a gluten free diet as well and I must say I feel better than ever. I am not fatigued or easily tired anymore; no digestive issues or hair loss. Actually, I am symptom free now 🙂 So thanks again for your help! TSH/T3/T4 have all improved. Also red blood cell count /vitamin D/DHEA/ improved. No zinc and copper deficiency anymore. Yes, it’s much easier to take a drug…but if you are looking for a cure, give a natural treatment protocol (and your internal system!) a fair chance.
Extra Virgin Coconut Oil: Extra virgin coconut oil is known to support and stimulate the functioning of the thyroid gland. Coconut oil consists of lauric acid, which possesses thyroid stimulating properties. Extra virgin coconut oil is more effective, as compared to regular coconut oil and is very stable. The oil can be either added to the food while cooking or a spoonful can be ingested as a supplement.
Physicians hesitated to use l-thyroxine monotherapy over concern that it could result in a relative T3 deficiency, despite growing discontent with potency of natural thyroid products (39) and reduced cost of l-thyroxine, such that the 2 treatments were approximately equivalent (36, 41). The seminal discovery of peripheral T4-to-T3 conversion in athyreotic individuals largely obviated this concern (42). This laid the foundation for the corollary that treatment with l-thyroxine could replace thyroid hormone in such a way that the prohormone pool would be restored and the deiodinases would regulate the pool of active T3. Within a decade there was a major transition toward l-thyroxine monotherapy as first-line therapy (Appendix Table and Figure) (38).
Hashimoto’s disease is the most common autoimmune disease linked to hypothyroidism. In fact, the condition in which the autoimmune system targets the thyroid specifically is commonly known as Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis. Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis is when the immune system targets antibodies directly to the thyroid, causing inflammation of the thyroid gland and thus limiting the gland’s ability to produce its delegated hormones.

Hypothyroidism occurs when the thyroid gland doesn't produce enough hormones. This can happen after the surgical removal of the thyroid gland, if infants were born with congenital hypothyroidism, stress or simply if the thyroid gland is tired of working and is not functioning well. If these hormones are not produced adequately, symptoms like cold intolerance, constipation, fatigue, weight gain, dry skin, goiter and even depression can occur. (See Hypothyroidism Symptoms for more symptoms)

Initial strategies for thyroid hormone replacement included thyroid transplantation, but efficacious pharmacologic strategies soon won favor. Natural thyroid preparations containing T4 and T3, such as desiccated thyroid, thyroid extracts, or thyroglobulin, were the initial pharmacologic agents. Synthetic agents were synthesized later. Early clinical trials demonstrated the efficacy of synthetic and natural agents, but concerns arose regarding consistency of natural thyroid preparations and adverse effects associated with T3-containing preparations (natural or synthetic). With the demonstration of peripheral T4-to-T3 conversion and the availability of the serum TSH radioimmunoassay in the early 1970s, there was a major trend in prescribing preference toward l-thyroxine monotherapy. BMR = basal metabolic rate; DT = desiccated thyroid; IV = intravenous; RIA = radioim-munoassay; T3 = triiodothyronine; T4 = thyroxine; TG = thyroglobulin; TSH = thyroid-stimulating hormone.


First things first, you must consider food to be your medicine and get off all processed junk food, sugar (which sends you on a hormonal rollercoaster ride) and gluten. The Daily Living Eating Plan is a great place to start. In addition, l-glutamine is a key amino acid that reduces cravings for high-glycemic carbohydrates and helps kick the sugar habit. If you have already done that and are looking to go deeper, here are some tips to heal the thyroid:
If you do choose to eat gluten, be sure to choose whole-grains varieties of bread, pasta, and rice, which are high in fiber and other nutrients and can help improve bowel irregularity, a common symptom of hypothyroidism. Also be sure to take your hypothyroidism medication several hours before or after eating high-fiber foods, to prevent them from interfering with the absorption of your synthetic thyroid hormone.

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Please Note: The material on this site is provided for informational purposes only and is not medical advice. Always consult your physician before beginning any diet or exercise program.

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