One of the fastest rising health conditions in the US is hypothyroidism. The most common symptoms experienced are lethargy, depression and weight gain. More than 12% of the US population will develop a thyroid condition during their lifetime with most of these being hypothyroidism (1).  In this article, I take a deep dive into thyroid physiology and go over 18 strategies to beat hypothyroidism naturally.

It's not enough for your thyroid levels to be "normal" or fall within the reference range. In many cases, for you to lose weight with hypothyroidism, you need your thyroid levels to be "optimal." That means that your thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level would typically fall below 2.0, and your free T4 and free T3 would fall in the upper half of the reference range.
Initial strategies for thyroid hormone replacement included thyroid transplantation, but efficacious pharmacologic strategies soon won favor. Natural thyroid preparations containing T4 and T3, such as desiccated thyroid, thyroid extracts, or thyroglobulin, were the initial pharmacologic agents. Synthetic agents were synthesized later. Early clinical trials demonstrated the efficacy of synthetic and natural agents, but concerns arose regarding consistency of natural thyroid preparations and adverse effects associated with T3-containing preparations (natural or synthetic). With the demonstration of peripheral T4-to-T3 conversion and the availability of the serum TSH radioimmunoassay in the early 1970s, there was a major trend in prescribing preference toward l-thyroxine monotherapy. BMR = basal metabolic rate; DT = desiccated thyroid; IV = intravenous; RIA = radioim-munoassay; T3 = triiodothyronine; T4 = thyroxine; TG = thyroglobulin; TSH = thyroid-stimulating hormone.

Probiotic-Rich Foods – These include kefir (a fermented dairy product) or organic goat’s milk yogurt, kimchi, kombucha, natto, sauerkraut and other fermented veggies. Part of your hypothyroidism diet, probiotics help create a healthy gut environment by balancing microflora bacteria, which reduces leaky gut syndrome, nutrient deficiencies, inflammation and autoimmune reactions.
People should take T4 on an empty stomach to prevent the absorption of the medication from being erratic. Moreover, doctors usually recommend taking the medication first thing in the morning, then waiting at least an hour to eat breakfast or drink coffee. Taking the medication at bedtime, several hours after the last meal, also appears to work and may be a more convenient approach for some people.

I think most people with hypothyroidism would agree that their condition is not due to a deficiency of synthetic thyroid hormone. Even though this is obviously true, most endocrinologists tell just about all of their patients with hypothyroidism and Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis to take synthetic thyroid hormone medication for the rest of their life without trying to find out why the person developed a hypothyroid condition to begin with. Although some people do need to take synthetic or natural thyroid hormone on a permanent basis, many people can have their health restored back to normal through natural hypothyroid treatment methods.


Try this: Cut apples crosswise (don’t peel them—the skin is the richest source of pectin!), dredge in brown sugar, then pan-fry in coconut oil until tender; top with shredded basil and crumbled blue cheese. Spiralize a whole apple with skin, lightly steam in apple juice until tender, and serve with yogurt, hemp seeds, and blueberries as a breakfast noodle bowl. Simmer chopped apples, parsnips, shallots, and sprigs of thyme in broth until tender; remove thyme sprigs and purée until smooth; top with additional thyme and a dollop of crème fraîche.
11.  Methylation:  Methylation is a key process that protects DNA, turns on and off genetic traits and helps to detoxify environmental chemicals.  Many individuals have certain genetic polymorphisms that limit their ability to appropriately methylate. Methylation plays a very important role in T cell function and poor methylation status is associated with the development of auto-immunity (31).
The best diet for your thyroid requires more than just iodine, selenium, and vitamin D, says Ilic. And—perhaps unsurprisingly—foods that are high in antioxidants are also good for your thyroid. One 2008 study by researchers from Turkey suggests that people with hypothyroidism have higher levels of harmful free radicals than those without the condition.
The thyroid is the organ with the highest selenium content in the whole body. Selenium is necessary for the production of the T3 thyroid hormone and can reduce autoimmune affects. In patients with Hashimoto’s disease and in pregnant women with thyroid disturbances, selenium supplementation decreases anti-thyroid antibody levels and improves the structure of the thyroid gland.
High-fat fried foods, like mozzarella sticks, jalapeno poppers and um…fried chicken and French fries can contribute to inflammation in the body, says Blum. Inflammation from Hashimoto’s disease, also known as chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis, often leads to an underactive thyroid gland. Hypothyroidism primarily affects middle-aged women, according to the Mayo Clinic, but it can target anyone at any age.

SUBJECT: Your thyroid gland is found just below your voice box or larynx. It wraps around your windpipe or your trachea. Your thyroid affects your metabolism. It makes hormones that affect how fast your whole body works and how it uses energy. Your body uses thyroid hormone to increase your energy and raise your body temperature when needed. For example, that helps replace the heat your body loses when exposed to cold weather.


Cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli and cabbage, are full of fiber and other nutrients, but they may interfere with the production of thyroid hormone if you have an iodine deficiency. So if you do, it’s a good idea to limit your intake of Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, kale, turnips, and bok choy, because research suggests digesting these vegetables may block the thyroid's ability to utilize iodine, which is essential for normal thyroid function. 

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Please Note: The material on this site is provided for informational purposes only and is not medical advice. Always consult your physician before beginning any diet or exercise program.

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