Adding yoga exercise to your daily exercise routine should be carried out only under the supervision of a trained yoga instructor. There are a number of specific yoga asanas or postures that can stimulate your thyroid and pituitary glands and increase the level of hormone production. Yoga poses such as the Sun Salutation, the Dead Man’s pose, the Wind Relieving pose, Head to Knee Pose, the Fish pose and the breathing techniques are vital for providing energy, improving blood circulation and relaxing the nervous system along with improving the functioning of the thyroid gland.
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*Cassava bears special mention here.  You may have heard of it because it is the starchy root vegetable from which tapioca is made, but cassava is also a popular staple food in many Third World countries, where it is eaten boiled, mashed, or ground into flour.  Fresh cassava root contains a harmless substance called linamarin, which can turn into hydrocyanic acid (aka cyanide!) when the plant is damaged or eaten. Flaxseeds also contain linamarin. Cyanide is very toxic, so the human body converts it into thiocyanate (which, although it does interfere with thyroid function, is less toxic than cyanide and easier for the body to eliminate).

If your sex hormones (estrogen, progesterone, testosterone) and adrenal hormones (cortisol, DHEA) are out of balance, this can make weight loss more difficult. Perimenopause and menopause, as well as estrogen dominance, can also cause a shift of weight to the belly, and make weight loss more difficult. Lack of testosterone in men and women can also make it harder to build fat-burning muscle. And adrenal imbalances can make you tired, less responsive to thyroid treatment, and less able to lose weight.


Ashwagandha is an adaptogen herb that helps the body respond to stress, keeping hormone levels better in balance. Adaptogens help lower cortisol and balance T4 levels. In fact, in clinical trials, supplementing with Ashwagandha for eight weeks helped hypothyroidism patients significantly increase thyroxine hormone levels, which reduced the severity of the disorder.[1] Also, try other adaptogen herbs like rhodiola, shisandra, ginseng and holy basil that have similar benefits.
The thyroid gland needs iodine, therefore if you have an underactive thyroid gland you should increase the iodine intake in your diet. A well-balanced diet that includes iodine can help in alleviating the symptoms that you encounter with your condition. With the simplest intake of the foods mentioned above, you can greatly assist your thyroid in keeping up with your body's metabolism. (See Hypothyroidism and Iodine for more information)
If you have hypothyroidism or a family history of goiters, you can reduce your risk by mixing up your choice of vegetables so you aren’t eating a lot of the same vegetable day in and day out, cooking your vegetables and chewing them thoroughly which helps to break down the worrisome substances, says Dr. Leung. And, it wouldn’t hurt to avoiding eating cruciferous vegetables raw; even lightly steaming then will deactivate the thiocyanates enough to assure that you aren’t eating more than your thyroid can handle.3
These clinical trials also began to define the adverse-effect profiles associated with these agents; thyrotoxicosis was frequently encountered. Patients treated with l-triiodothyronine3 (100 to 175 mcg/d) normalized BMR faster than did those receiving desiccated thyroid (120 to 210 mg/d) or l-thyroxine (200 to 350 mcg/d) but were more likely to experience angina (32). Desiccated thyroid was also associated with adverse symptoms in other studies; muscle stiffness, psychosis, and angina all occurred (33). In a crossover study of l-triiodothyronine monotherapy (75 to 100 mcg/d), l-thyroxine monotherapy (200 to 300 mcg/d), and desiccated thyroid (1.5 to 3 grains/d), all of these therapies restored BMR and serum PBI; with l-triiodothyronine, however, angina and heart failure occurred. Dose reduction corrected these adverse effects, but authors concluded that l-thyroxine monotherapy or thyroid extract was preferred (34). In a trial of l-thyroxine monotherapy at doses of 200 to 300 mcg/d versus l-thyroxine (80 mcg) plus l-triiodothyronine (20 mcg) daily, patients receiving the combination had such symptoms as palpitations, nervousness, tremor, and perspiration (35). Some early proponents of l-thyroxine monotherapy emerged because of less frequent thyrotoxic effects (24), but it is difficult to determine whether such adverse effects were related to the agent used or its high dosage. Thyrotoxic adverse effects were typically remediable by simple dose reduction (36), so desiccated thyroid remained the preparation of choice (37).
Cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli and cabbage, are full of fiber and other nutrients, but they may interfere with the production of thyroid hormone if you have an iodine deficiency. So if you do, it’s a good idea to limit your intake of Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, kale, turnips, and bok choy, because research suggests digesting these vegetables may block the thyroid's ability to utilize iodine, which is essential for normal thyroid function. 

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Please Note: The material on this site is provided for informational purposes only and is not medical advice. Always consult your physician before beginning any diet or exercise program.

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