The main job of the thyroid gland is to combine the salt iodine with the amino acid tyrosine to make thyroid hormone.  Whenever the thyroid gland has a hard time making enough thyroid hormone, it becomes stressed and grows bigger to try to do its job better, forming a “goiter” (enlarged thyroid).  Substances that interfere with normal thyroid function are called “goitrogens” because they have the potential to cause goiter.
Your article is really helpful. I was diagnosed with hypothyroid almost 7 years back using imaging of gland and started off with 50 mcg of thyroxine which gradually increased to 100 mcg. My mother and both the brothers also have the problem but they live a normal life. However, I feel chronic throat infection (almost every month), viral fever (mild fever running for long duration), my throat reacts to the cold weather, dust etc. I feel extreme fatigue most time. Since last two years, my condition has worsen. My T3 level is usually at the lower end (even after medication). I used to take protein suppliments which caused me lot of stomach troubles and eggs too. Now I have stopped all the heavy proteins. How can I live a normal life? I am 43 years old male (a scientist) and want to have an active life and career. Please help me.
I was concerned about an ongoing “mental fog” and forgetfulness I had – which is one of the symptoms of Hashimoto’s. I was having trouble losing weight and also felt very low in energy. Since following Dr. Osansky’s recommendations I have found that I have a greater sense of calm – something I didn’t expect from the treatment and changes in diet and lifestyle. In addition to getting my Hashimoto’s under control, I have enjoyed other health benefits as well. I no longer suffer from anemia, my Vitamin D levels are normal and my immune system is strong. My thyroid blood tests also improved. Although it’s a commitment and initial expense, it is completely worth it in the long run. Given the alternative (taking thyroid medication for the rest of your life), in my opinion it’s a no brainer. If you give a natural treatment protocol a fair chance you’d be surprised at how much more empowered you’ll feel about your illness and treating it. A natural treatment protocol is an effective solution that puts you in the driver’s seat when it comes to your health. Traditional methods do the exact opposite.
Essential fatty acids found in fish oil are critical for brain and thyroid function. DHA and EPA omega-3s found in fish oil are associated with a lower risk for thyroid symptoms, including anxiety, depression, high cholesterol, inflammatory bowel disease, arthritis, diabetes, a weakened immune system and heightened autoimmune disease. Omega-3 fish oil supplements can also help balance levels of omega-6s in the diet, which is important for ongoing health.
Goitrogen Foods – Eating large amounts of raw Brassica vegetables like broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, kale, soy and Brussels sprouts might impact thyroid function because these contain goitrogens, molecules that impair thyroid perioxidase. When consuming these cruciferous vegetables, it’s best to steam them for 30 minutes before consuming to reduce the goitrogenic effect and keep portions moderate in size. These pose more of a risk for people with iodine deficiencies.

Try this: Cut apples crosswise (don’t peel them—the skin is the richest source of pectin!), dredge in brown sugar, then pan-fry in coconut oil until tender; top with shredded basil and crumbled blue cheese. Spiralize a whole apple with skin, lightly steam in apple juice until tender, and serve with yogurt, hemp seeds, and blueberries as a breakfast noodle bowl. Simmer chopped apples, parsnips, shallots, and sprigs of thyme in broth until tender; remove thyme sprigs and purée until smooth; top with additional thyme and a dollop of crème fraîche.


It is medically proven that small frequent meals are healthier for persons with hypothyroidism compared to eating large-bulky meals per day. A study showed that eating 5-6 small meals a day will help a person lose weight and ward off the symptoms of the disease. It does not only help your intestines to digest food, it also keeps your energy level up.

Getting enough fiber is good for you, but too much can complicate your hypothyroidism treatment. The government's Daily Guidelines for Americans currently recommends that older adults take in 20 to 35 grams of fiber a day. Amounts of dietary fiber from whole grains, vegetables, fruits, beans, and legumes that go above that level affect your digestive system and can interfere with absorption of thyroid hormone replacement drugs.


Getting enough fiber is good for you, but too much can complicate your hypothyroidism treatment. The government's Daily Guidelines for Americans currently recommends that older adults take in 20 to 35 grams of fiber a day. Amounts of dietary fiber from whole grains, vegetables, fruits, beans, and legumes that go above that level affect your digestive system and can interfere with absorption of thyroid hormone replacement drugs.

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Please Note: The material on this site is provided for informational purposes only and is not medical advice. Always consult your physician before beginning any diet or exercise program.

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