Dr. George Springer has practiced alternative medicine for 31 years with an emphasis on treating chronic disease conditions. He received his undergraduate BA from the University of Missouri in St. Louis and his Doctor of Chiropractic (D.C.) from Logan University where he graduated magna cum laude. He went on to receive his Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine (N.M.D.) from the American Naturopathic Medical Institute a division of Breyer State University in Los Angeles, California.
The thyroid is a small, butterfly-shaped gland found near the base of the neck. It produces hormones that regulate vital metabolic processes throughout the body. A deficiency in the production of thyroid hormone, known as hypothyroidism, causes these processes to slow down or stop. Receptors for thyroid hormone are found throughout the body, and disturbance in thyroid functioning can cause problems in almost every system of the body from the heart and GI tract to sleep, mood, even the growth of hair, skin and nails.
72. Garber JR, Cobin RH, Gharib H, Hennessey JV, Klein I, Mechanick JI, et al. American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and American Thyroid Association Taskforce on Hypothyroidism in Adults. Clinical practice guidelines for hypothyroidism in adults: co-sponsored by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and the American Thyroid Association. Thyroid. 2012;22:1200–1235. [PMID: 22954017] [PubMed]
Try this: Cut apples crosswise (don’t peel them—the skin is the richest source of pectin!), dredge in brown sugar, then pan-fry in coconut oil until tender; top with shredded basil and crumbled blue cheese. Spiralize a whole apple with skin, lightly steam in apple juice until tender, and serve with yogurt, hemp seeds, and blueberries as a breakfast noodle bowl. Simmer chopped apples, parsnips, shallots, and sprigs of thyme in broth until tender; remove thyme sprigs and purée until smooth; top with additional thyme and a dollop of crème fraîche.
Levothyroxine tablets come in 12 different strengths, and it is essential to take them in a consistent manner every day. A dose of thyroid hormone that is too low may fail to prevent enlargement of the thyroid gland, allow symptoms of hypothyroidism to persist, and be associated with increased serum cholesterol levels, which may increase the risk for atherosclerosis and heart disease. A dose that is too high can cause symptoms of hyperthyroidism, create excessive strain on the heart, and lead to an increased risk of developing osteoporosis.

Major diagnostic and therapeutic advancements in the early 20th century dramatically changed the prognosis of hypothyroidism from a highly morbid condition to one that could be successfully managed with safe, effective therapies. These advancements dictated treatment trends that have led to the adoption of l-thyroxine monotherapy, administered at doses to normalize serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), as the contemporary standard of care (Figure). Most patients do well with this approach, which both normalizes serum TSH levels and leads to symptomatic remission (1).
Cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cauliflower, and cabbage naturally release a compound called goitrin when they’re hydrolyzed, or broken down. Goitrin can interfere with the synthesis of thyroid hormones. However, this is usually a concern only when coupled with an iodine deficiency.17 Heating cruciferous vegetables denatures much or all of this potential goitrogenic effect.18
Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. Unless you've been diagnosed with celiac disease, it probably won’t affect your thyroid. Gluten can damage the small intestines of people with celiac disease. They can have other autoimmune disorders like Hashimoto’s disease (which leads to an underactive thyroid) and Graves' disease (which leads to an overactive thyroid). If you have celiac disease, a gluten-free diet may help prevent these thyroid diseases.
Gluten — Many people with thyroid issues are also sensitive to gluten or have celiac disease, an autoimmune disease that results in an allergy to gluten. Gluten is found in all wheat, rye and barley products. Carefully check ingredient labels to avoid hidden gluten that is lurking in many packaged foods. Undiagnosed sensitivities to gluten can further raise inflammation, create nutrient deficiencies and worsen hormonal problems.
Vitamin B12 and thiamine are important for neurologic function and hormonal balance. Research shows that supplementing with thiamine can help combat symptoms of autoimmune disease, including chronic fatigue. In one clinical study, when patients with Hashimoto’s were given 600 milligrams per day of thiamine, the majority experienced complete regression of fatigue within a few hours or days. (18)
“A teaspoon of iodine is all a person requires in a lifetime, but because iodine cannot be stored for long periods by the body, tiny amounts are needed regularly. In areas of endemic iodine deficiency, where soil and therefore crops and grazing animals do not provide sufficient dietary iodine to the populace, food fortification and supplementation have proven highly successful and sustainable interventions.” [Brahmbhatt 2001].
Short of eating a few kelp salads, you probably don't have to worry about getting too much iodine from any other foods. In particular, dairy products are full of this nutrient (and in more manageable amounts), according to a 2012 research in the journal Nutrition Reviews. Part of the reason is because livestock are given iodine supplements and the milking process involves iodine-based cleaners. Plain, low-fat yogurt, or Greek yogurt is a good source—it can make up about 50% of your daily intake of iodine.

Thyroid patients can’t manage their condition through diet. However, eating the wrong foods or taking the wrong supplements can cause trouble. Advertising Policy Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy Among the foods that thyroid patients … Read More


*In the years prior to the discovery of peripheral T4-to-T3 conversion, most groups recommended treatment with natural thyroid preparations, such as desiccated thyroid, thyroid extract, or thyroglobulin, which contain both T4 and T3. However with the discovery of T4-to-T3 conversion and the development of the radioimmunoassay for TSH in the early 1 970s, not only was there a trend toward l-thyroxine monotherapy, but the recommended daily maintenance doses decreased significantly. These trends led to the adoption of the contemporary standard of care: l-thyroxine monotherapy administered at doses to maintain a normal serum TSH level.


Refined Flour Products — Any food made with refined carbohydrates, like enriched wheat flour, for example, negatively impacts hormone levels and can contribute to weight gain. Refined flour products include bread, cereals, pastas and all baked goods. If possible, remove most grains from your diet altogether. Or at least try to greatly limit the amount of products you eat that are made with any flour by choosing 100 percent whole, ancient grains instead (like quinoa, buckwheat, etc.).
Selenium:   Selenium is one the MOST IMPORTANT when it comes to healthy thyroid function!  It is incorporated into key enzymes involved in several metabolic pathways implicated in thyroid hormone metabolism; additionally, it plays an antioxidant role in the regulation of the immune system.   There are strong links between selenium deficiencies and auto-immune thyroid problems (48, 49).
They are the building blocks of your digestive tract and of our hormones. We are fat-phobic in America, and low-fat diets are one of the worst things we’ve ever invented. Europeans and Asians have fat-rich diets (traditionally) and enjoy much better health than we do. Good fat tips: avocados, walnuts, coconut oil, coconut butter. Animal fats are the best in restoring a troubled digestion; ghee (clarified butter), butter, chicken and beef fat are essential but need to be rendered and not in fried or processed form.
** Medications** - Some medications can contribute to hypothyroidism. Medicines such as lithium, amiodarone, interleukin-2 and interferon alpha can prevent the thyroid gland from producing its hormones normally. These medicines are most likely to affect the thyroid’s functionality in patients who have a genetic susceptibility to autoimmune thyroid disease.
There is an association between vitamin D deficiency and Hashimoto's disease, the most common cause of hypothyroidism, according to a study in the issue of August 2011 issue of the journal "Thyroid". Fortified milk not only has added vitamin D, but also significant amounts of calcium, protein, and iodine. Because Hashimoto's may also lead to changes that contribute to gut issues like heartburn, foods such as yogurt with good bacteria may help regulate other bacteria, Dodell says.
Hypothyroidism symptoms include: family history of thyroid disorders, hormonal imbalances, irregular periods, infertility, constipation and other digestion issues, weight gain, bloating, puffy face, irregular hair loss and/or thinning of your hair and/or your hair has become coarse, dry, breaking, brittle, and/or is falling out, acne and/or dry or thinning skin, mood disorders, like anxiety or depression, fatigue, low energy and/or low libido, increased sensitivity to cold, low body temperature usually below 98.6 degrees and/or cold hands and feet, muscle weakness, aches, tenderness and stiffness and/or pain, stiffness or swelling in your joints, trouble falling asleep or staying asleep, numbness or tingling in your hands & fingers, difficulty concentrating, focusing or remembering things and brain fog.
Zinc is another key nutrient for your thyroid—your body needs it to churn out TH. Take in too little zinc, and it can lead to hypothyroidism. But get this: If you develop hypothyroidism, you can also become deficient in zinc, since your thyroid hormones help absorb the mineral, explains Ilic. And when that happens, you may also experience side effects like severe alopecia, an autoimmune condition that attacks hair follicles and makes it fall out in clumps, according to one 2013 report.
55. National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (Adult Treatment Panel III) Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (Adult Treatment Panel III) final report. Circulation. 2002;106:3143–3421. [PMID: 12485966] [PubMed]
Wild-caught fish – These provide omega-3 fatty acids EPA/DHA that are essential for hormone balance and thyroid function. Balancing the level of omega-3 to omega-6 fatty acids in your hypothyroidism diet can reduce inflammation and support healthy neurological function. Wild fish like salmon, mackerel and sardines are some of the best sources of omega-3s to increase neurotransmitter activity and support a healthy mood and immune system.
There are medications commonly prescribed to limit the activity of the thyroid. Surgery may also be recommended as a last resort to remove all or part of the thyroid. It’s worth researching ways to treat hyperthyroidism naturally, as removing sources of inflammation from your diet and taking advantage of thyroid-supporting supplements and essential oils can help to make a big difference.

Clinicians noted several differences in the ability of l-thyroxine monotherapy to normalize markers of hypothyroidism at doses that normalized serum TSH (45). For instance, in many l-thyroxine-treated patients with a normal serum TSH, the BMR remained at about 10% less than that of normal controls even after 3 months of therapy (53). At the same time, doses of l-thyroxine that normalize the BMR can suppress serum TSH and cause iatrogenic thyrotoxicosis (28, 45, 46). The clinical significance of this was not fully understood because many patients appeared clinically euthyroid with a BMR between −20% and −10% (36, 37).
Thank you for the information. I’ve been on the meds four years and I keep on getting fat and sluggish plus all the other symptoms. I’m exhausted. I also want to share that the medication and a good diet don’t cure this disease in everybody. A reliable herbalist told me it’s possible to replace the medication for a natural iodine source; to slowly lower the synthetic medication as I start ingesting algae supplements. It’s very dangerous to stop talking the synthetic med all at once. So the switch has to be very slow into the algae. I’m gonna order the algae and start giving it a chance.

Essential fatty acids found in fish oil are critical for brain and thyroid function. DHA and EPA omega-3s found in fish oil are associated with a lower risk for thyroid symptoms, including anxiety, depression, high cholesterol, inflammatory bowel disease, arthritis, diabetes, a weakened immune system and heightened autoimmune disease. Omega-3 fish oil such as cod liver oil can also help balance levels of omega-6s in the diet, which is important for ongoing health.


Goitrogenic foods can act like an antithyroid drug in disabling the thyroid function. They prevent the thyroid from using available iodine. It is made worse if you use a lot of salt because that causes the thyroid to swell. Do not eat these in large amounts if you are taking thyroid hormone replacement. It is thought that the enzymes involved in the formation of goitrogenic materials in plants can be destroyed by cooking, so cook these foods thoroughly if you want to eat them.


I have been diagnosed with hypothyroidism since last year. The worst part I struggle with my weight all my life. When my doctor told me I had hypo, it was the worst day of my life!!. Now the weight gained was the biggest problem for me. However, I found a program that helps me a lot. My number 1 program to followed if you are serious about losing weight fast. https://bit.ly/2tb4l9b
You can order thyroid tests yourself. Most people do not know that. You can do so by going to Direct Labs.  They cover more than just TSH and T4 – you will get the full spectrum of results which you need to know to manage your thyroid and Hashimoto’s. Finding out this information about yourself will help you better understand how the thyroid diet can help you.
Thyroid scanning is used to determine how active the thyroid is in manufacturing thyroid hormone. This can determine whether inflammation of the thyroid gland (thyroiditis) is present. It can also detect the presence and degree of overactivity of the gland (hyperthyroidism) or, conversely, it can determine the presence and degree of underactivity of the gland (hypothyroidism).

Thyroid disease and disorder symptoms and signs depend on the type of the thyroid problem. Examples include heat or cold intolerance, sweating, weight loss or gain, palpitations, fatigue, dry skin, constipation, brittle hair, joint aches and pains, heart palpitations, edema, feeling bloated, puffiness in the face, reduced menstrual flow, changes in the frequency of bowel movements and habits, high cholesterol, hoarseness, brittle hair, difficulty swallowing, shortness of breath, a visible lump or swelling in the neck, tremors, memory problems, depression, nervousness, agitation, irritability, or poor concentration.


If you are diagnosed with hypothyroidism, it may sound horrible, but you could be in it for life. This means you'll need to change your diet and lifestyle entirely. There must be a conscious and consistent plan for your everyday intake of food to prevent flares of symptoms that could disrupt your everyday routine. If you adhere strongly to your diet plan, then there shouldn't be any worries about symptom attacks later on.
If for some reason the pituitary gland or the hypothalamus are unable to signal the thyroid and instruct it to produce thyroid hormones, it may cause decreased T4 and T3 blood levels, even if the thyroid gland itself is normal. If pituitary disease causes this defect, the condition is called "secondary hypothyroidism." If the defect is due to hypothalamic disease, it is called "tertiary hypothyroidism."
Thank you for the information. I’ve been on the meds four years and I keep on getting fat and sluggish plus all the other symptoms. I’m exhausted. I also want to share that the medication and a good diet don’t cure this disease in everybody. A reliable herbalist told me it’s possible to replace the medication for a natural iodine source; to slowly lower the synthetic medication as I start ingesting algae supplements. It’s very dangerous to stop talking the synthetic med all at once. So the switch has to be very slow into the algae. I’m gonna order the algae and start giving it a chance.

Alcohol consumption can wreak havoc on both thyroid hormone levels in the body and the ability of the thyroid to produce hormone. Alcohol appears to have a toxic effect on the thyroid gland and suppresses the ability of the body to use thyroid hormone. Ideally, people with hypothyroidism should cut out alcohol completely or drink in careful moderation.

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Please Note: The material on this site is provided for informational purposes only and is not medical advice. Always consult your physician before beginning any diet or exercise program.

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